Top Plants to Plant in The Fall

Stone circleSpring isn’t the only time of year for planting! Some flowers, trees and shrubs do best when they’re planted in fall. Knowing what needs to be planted in fall can help you make your landscaping plans for the coming year.

Turfgrass

Turfgrass is best installed on your lawn in the early to middle fall, just as the weather is starting to get cool for the winter. You can install turf at other times of the year, but if it’s very hot or dry, your grass will need special attention in order to thrive. Working with a landscape contractor to get the job done can help ensure that your grass will thrive.

There are two ways to install turf: scattering seeds or laying sod. Seeds take longer and the results can be spotty, depending on how religiously you water and care for your grass until the turf is established. Sod is a fully ready option that can quickly transform your yard and be ready in time for your next backyard barbecue.

You’ll need to avoid walking on your grass for a certain length after it’s installed, so talk to your landscape contractor to get the best advice for ensuring your grass establishes properly.

Spring Bulbs

Spring bulbs are planted in the ground in mid to early fall and are left there to overwinter. The cold period before the bulb is planted is an important part of the growing process.

If you miss the opportunity to plant your bulbs in fall, you may have to buy pre-planted, sprouted bulbs the following spring. Alternatively, you can also plant something else and wait to plant bulbs until next year.

If you work with a landscaper to do your planting, be sure to bring up the spring bulbs toward the end of the summer to work a time into your schedule when you can make this happen.

Trees

Trees, like turf grass, do well when established in fall. The cool weather allows tree roots to grow until winter weather causes the tree to go dormant. The most challenging time of year for your tree is summer, so planting in fall gives your tree just a little more time until the harsh weather of summer sets in.

Trees need a lot of supplemental watering in the weeks following planting, especially if the tree is larger when it goes in the ground. Work closely with your landscape contractor to get your tree planted and established before it goes dormant for the winter.

Cool-Season Vegetables

Although most vegetables need to be planted in the spring in order to spend the summer growing and producing, some vegetables are best grown in the cooler season. Cool-season vegetables are usually planted late in the growing season and spent the fall or even winter in the garden bed, growing slowly.

There’s an art to planting and cultivating cool-season vegetables. Some gardeners cover their vegetables with clear plastic to protect them from the harshest temperatures.

Some gardeners actually build a greenhouse in their backyard for growing winter vegetables. The greenhouse captures light from the sun to create a warmer temperature inside than the vegetables are exposed to outside. Talk to your landscape contractor to get a greenhouse built on your property.

Evergreens

Evergreens, including evergreen shrubs and trees, are best planted in fall for the same reasons that deciduous trees are planted in fall. If you’re interested in planting evergreen shrubs as a privacy screen, your landscape contractor can help you decide which evergreens will provide the most privacy and will grow the fastest, for best results.

Peonies

Peonies are typically sold in the fall because it’s the best time to plant them. This flowering shrub-like plant produces shaggy blossoms that make beautiful additions to your summer bouquets. It’s well-known that peonies attract ants, which help keep the plant free of other insects that could do damage.

Peonies spread slowly over time, sending out shoots that can grow your line of peonies over many years. This relatively low-maintenance, traditional midwest plant is an excellent alternative to roses, which require far more pruning and care in order to look their best.

Lavender

Lavender is a low-maintenance shrub that needs little water to produce beautiful, fragrant flower spears that attract bees and other beneficial insects. Lavender shrubs can grow quite large if not properly pruned.

Plant lavender at the end of the summer when the weather is just starting to cool. Planting lavender in late summer gives your lavender plenty of time to become established before the freezing weather hits. This plant needs about 10 weeks of good weather for growing before winter sets in.

Once established, lavender is a perfect shrub for a gardener who doesn’t want to spend a lot of money on watering and who also doesn’t want to spend a lot of time maintaining fussy plants.

Contact Your Landscape Contractor

Fall is a good time to plant certain types of shrubs, flowers, trees and grasses. Working with a landscape contractor takes the mystery out of maintaining a beautiful yard.

To find out more about maintaining a beautiful property and thriving landscape plants, contact Hidden Creek Landscaping. With over 20 years in the business, we can help make your home the envy of the neighborhood.

 

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How Does Winter Weather Affect Landscaping?

While winter weather can be beautiful to look at, it can have an ugly impact on your landscaping. Cold weather brings dry air, snow, and frost which can leave your plants and lawn looking run-down by the time the spring season finally arrives. Here’s a closer look at the effects of winter on landscaping:

Wind Damage
Wind can cause damage in any season, and in the winter, it can also be accompanied by snow. Blowing snow drifts can cause snow to pile up on some areas of the lawn, while other spots may see less accumulation. This can cause some areas to see worse damage than others. Winds can also lead to downed branches from trees and shrubs. Even if the plant is well-established, this damage can still kill it. To prevent this, pruning before the winter is important. During the season, you may also consider shaking the snow off or gently removing it with a broom.

Dry Air
Winter can bring plenty of moisture in the form of frost, snow, and ice, but the cold air that sticks around for months is dry and lacking in moisture. Just like our lips and skin dry out after exposure to the cold, plants will too. The dry air, especially when combined with the wind, can cause plants of all kinds to dry out. Evergreen trees are especially vulnerable to damage from the dry air. One way to reduce the negative effects is by pruning and fertilizing plants before the cold air sets in.

Heavy, Wet Snow
Snow can lead to several different problems for plants and lawns. One issue is snow mold growth, which occurs when snow that has accumulated on turf starts to melt. The mold growth leads to patches of brown and pink which kills the grass. In the spring, the grass may need to be raked and reseeded if the damage is too severe. Prevention is the key, and can be handled by properly aerating and fertilizing the lawn beforehand.

winter weather affects landscaping

Heavy snowfall can also damage plants and trees. As snow piles up on branches, it can cause the branches to sag and snap under the weight. Again, proper pruning of trees, shrubs, and other small plants is essential in the weeks before the cold and wet weather settles in. By keeping these plants pruned, it will be easier to prevent limb breakage.

Professional Care
One of the best ways to keep your lawn and gardens in great shape is by working with a professional landscaper. They have the right equipment, knowledge, and skills to maintain the look and quality of your landscaping throughout the year. Proper prevention can help reduce the damage that cold winter weather can do to your property.

When it comes to keeping your landscaping looking its best throughout the year, proper preventative measures and quality care-taking measures are key. By taking steps to protect your lawn and garden, you’ll be able to ensure that the cold weather doesn’t do severe damage to your landscaping during the winter months.

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Essential Tips for Gardening In The Heat Of The Summer

Lawn care and gardening in the heat of summer Hidden Creek Landscaping July 2017Summer lawn care can be tougher to manage than other times of the year. The high temperatures can take a toll on your lawn and plants, leaving grass looking dry and yellowed, not to mention wilted flowers. Here are some tips for gardening during the heat of summer:

Water often

Keep grass green and flowers well watered during hot stretches. Check the forecast frequently to see if rain is expected. If it isn’t, be sure to water your lawn and plants in the early morning. It’s best to water in the mornings rather than the evenings. Try to avoid watering during the peak of the afternoon heat, since it will be harder for the lawn and plants to absorb the moisture.

Choose the right plants and the locations

When planting shrubs, flowers, and vegetables and herbs, it’s important to choose the right areas of your property. Consider the amount of sun that each area receives during the day. Aim for morning sunshine and afternoon shade for vegetable gardens. Check the requirements for each plant specifically. Some require full sun, while others need just a few hours.

Stay on top of weeding

Believe it or not, some weeds actually thrive in the sun and heat. In the evenings, you’ll want to check over your flower beds and keep up with weed removal. Try to pull them out by the root. Use a weed killer when necessary to tackle tough weeds.
Heat and humidity can cause stress for your lawn and garden. Proper care and upkeep throughout the summer months are critical to maintaining the beauty of your property. If you want a landscaping design that will look great throughout the summer without a lot of effort, consider working with a design-build firm. At Hidden Creek Landscaping, we will be able to come up with the best plan for your property, ensuring ideal care for every season.

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Irrigation Systems: The Key To A Summer Backyard

Irrigation Systems for Summer Hidden Creek Landscaping June 2017Getting your yard looking like a million bucks doesn’t cost that much. In fact, with minimal effort and regular application, you can maintain a pristine landscape. There’s no disputing, however, that the task of watering can be quite demanding, both physically, and financially. Like us, plants require water. Without it they wilt and loose their natural splendor. Irrigation is man’s century old solution to all those hurdles. Simply turn the valve and everything takes care of itself.

In terms of cost, setting up an irrigation system is expensive. On the flip-side, however, it’s only a once off cost and you’re set for many years.

Drill A Borehole: Say Goodbye To Municipal Water

Municipal water, though easily accessible, is generally expensive to say the least, and it’s unreliable at times. So what is your best option? Do yourself a favor and drill a borehole! This allows you to have a constant supply of free, clean water, which is a wise move now that drought is a perennial problem in most parts of the world. With your borehole drilled and the piping connected to the mains, installing your irrigation system remains.

 
Lawn Maintenance: Let Out The Sprinklers!

Invest in an automated sprinkler system. As for your flower beds, there are vertical sprayers that can be mounted at strategic positions amongst the flowers. Again, turn the tap and your yard will be engulfed in a cool mist that is is also perfect for any nearby vegetation. It’s really about taking plant care seriously. The other option homeowners have is drip irrigation. Preferable for fruit trees, vegetable gardens and bushes, drip irrigation is sustainable in the dry months when every drop counts.

Yes, irrigation systems are hefty to install, but you’ll certainly have the freedom to express your landscaping ideas without limitation. Consult with Hidden Creek Landscaping to design an irrigation system best fit for your yard.

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