What Are the Best Trees for Ohio Landscaping?

The unpredictability of midwest weather can cause a lot of frustration.  One minute it is sunny, and it could be storming the next. There can be snow in the springtime and warm winter days. However, when the weather messes with your landscape, it can be discouraging. After all, homeowners usually put a lot of time, effort and money into the landscaping to ensure that it is always looking splendid.

To stop this frustrating dilemma from affecting your landscape, here is a list of trees, flowers, and shrubbery that will survive year-round in Ohio:

Best Trees for Ohio Landscaping

Red Oak Tree

The sturdy and heavy Red Oak wood has a reddish-orange color that adds vibrant color to the landscape and is an excellent source of shade.

Japanese Tree Lilac

The Japanese Tree Lilac is perfect for those who are looking for an exceptional accent plant with beautiful and fragrant spring blooms.  A big part of the popularity of this tree is that it is low-maintenance and resistant to diseases. Also, it prefers moist, well-drained soil, thrives in direct sunlight and requires very little pruning.  Among the most favorite selections of the tree are Summer Snow and Ivory Silk.

Witch Hazel Tree

This tree is a remarkable option for broad and open areas in your landscape.  The tree favors partial shade or direct sunlight and soil that is moist and well-drained.  Its orange and yellow foliage creates a spectacular display during the fall months. Even when there is snow on the ground, the Witch Hazel tree will flower.  The spicy fragrance and twisting branches of the tree are particularly unique and form a part of its grand appeal. crabapple tree

Crabapple Tree

Easy to grow and stunningly beautiful, crab apple trees produce incredible flower shows during the spring.  It is necessary for these trees to be planted in well-drained loamy soil because fruit trees will not flourish in wet soils. Crabapple trees require good air circulation and full sun exposure to ensure the leaves stay dry.  It is essential to keep these leaves dry because wet leaves on fruit trees tend to cause diseases. When the apples fall, disease resistant varieties will not create a mess.

American Hornbeam Tree

American Hornbeam trees are a fantastic option for naturalized or woody landscapes.  This magnificent tree thrives in shade or partial sunlight and favors soil that is wet and well drained. The American Hornbeam is native to the northeast and produces outstanding red and yellow foliage during the months of fall.

Pagoda Dogwood Tree

The Pagoda Dogwood tree is a well sought after the native of the Midwest and hails, more specifically, from the state of Minnesota.  This tree favors full sun exposure or partial shade and thrives well in these conditions. The foliage of this tree is a beautiful purple that shows out during the fall.  It produces a pleasing aroma and creamy white blossoms during the spring. The Pagoda Dogwood tree can be significantly affected by city pollution, and as such, your Pagoda Dogwood should not be planted near to the roadside. Argentina and Venus are popular types of the Pagoda Dogwood tree, and its unique horizontal branching is one of its most remarkable features.

Japanese Maple Tree

This spectacular tree produces beautiful spring and fall colors.  During the fall, its textured foliage changes to a hue that ranges from deep red to purple.  White and pink blooms show up in the spring and last into the months of summer. To maintain its form, it requires pruning, or it will reduce into a shrub.  It favors minimal sunlight and light shade and thrives best in average, well-drained soil. While this tree is typically hardy in Ohio, it is best to check with a local nursery to determine the variety that will thrive best in your region. Japanese maple tree

Asimina Triloba (Pawpaw)

This deciduous, conical tree grows between 12 and 20 feet tall.  It has tropical-looking leaves that turn yellow in autumn and become as big as 12 inches.  Dark-brown, velvety flower buds produce upside-down, maroon flowers as big as 2 inches across that bud for approximately six weeks early in the springtime. The Asimina Triloba produces the largest native edible fruit in America, and its flavor is similar to both banana and mango. Once established, this tree can tolerate full sun exposure, and young trees favor filtered sun. 

Stewartia Pseudocamellia (Japanese Stewartia)

This deciduous, slow-growing tree is shaped like a pyramid and extends between 20 and 30 feet in height and 8 and 25 feet in width.  It can be single trunk or multi-stem, prefers partial shade, favors well-drained soil and has no tolerance for drought. In July, its cup-shaped, white flowers emerge, and its fall foliage has incredible shades of burgundy and reddish-orange. It reddish-brown bark provides interest and fantastic winter color.  It can be used near the patio or as a specimen plant in the yard.

Best Shrubs for Ohio Landscaping

Buxus “Winter Gem” 

This trouble-free, dependable evergreen is not a deer favorite.  It is most effective when used to create a hedge, and it produces glossy, medium-textured foliage.  The leaves will hold their color even throughout long and brutal winters. This shrub’s growth becomes a refreshing light green color in the Spring.  It can be used to bring evergreen structure to the landscape, which is mainly essential during the winter when there is very little green left.  It is a low-maintenance plant as it only requires pruning once or twice a year.

Clethra Alnifolia (Summersweet)

This native shrub is delightfully fragrant, attracts beautiful butterflies and blooms in mid to late summer. The elegant foliage and form of taller varieties make them great accents for anyt landscape.  They typically reach between 5 and 6 feet tall and 3 feet wide. Shorter cultivars like the ‘Hummingbird’ work well for repetition and massing, staying approximately 2½ to 3 feet tall.

If you need more information about types of plants for Ohio landscaping or need help with a design, contact us!

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What Are The Best Plants for Ohio Winter?

Weather in Ohio is quite unpredictable and winters often seem severe to plant-loving landscape and garden enthusiasts.  The gray skies, biting winds, and snowfall make it difficult to see the grounds-eye view of the landscape. This typically makes it hard to imagine having a beautiful yard during these cold-weather months.  However, if you would like to ensure a superb landscape all year long, there are options. Below are some of the best plants for Ohio’s winter:

American Beech

With the American Beech’s pointy buds, you will still be able to see leftovers of last year’s beechnuts, which can be found all throughout all of Ohio. The tapering surface roots and smooth, steel-gray bark make these trees easily recognized and wonderful to see, even from a distance. Even when highlighted against a bleak winter sky, these trees are remarkable to behold. In addition, American beeches have “marcescent” leaves, which means that the leaves from the previous season remain on the plant until spring (this is also the case for several types of oak trees).  These remaining leaves serve as the spectacular sylvan and golden foliar reminders of the past season.

Evergreens

Austrian Pine: The Austrian Pine is one of the most common evergreen tree species in Ohio. This type of conifer is covered in full, dark green branches covered in pine needles. It also has unique, black and white bark with a checkered or striped texture. It can grow to be extremely large at an average of 60 feet tall by 40 feet wide. This tree grows well in moist, clay-heavy soil which is very common across all of Ohio. evergreen tree in winter

Blue Spruce (Colorado Spruce): This is one of the most common types of evergreen trees grown in Ohio and the United States. This tree is typically known for its blue or blue-silver color and has several different growth habits such as dwarf, weeping, broad, columnar, and pyramidal. Blue Spruces can usually grow to be 50 feet tall by 25 feet wide around the bottom.

Yew: A yew bush or tree is a type of conifer which grows red seeds berry-like seeds instead of cones. Aside from the berries, the yew has small needles which are dark green and grey-green. Because the yew is an evergreen, it retains this color throughout the year.

Scotch Pine: The Scotch Pine is also known as the Scots Pine because it originated in Scotland. This tree has a crooked or twisted trunk that can split into different branches that shoot in different directions. This gives each Scotch Pine a unique look. These trees may extend to 50 feet tall by 30 feet wide if mature and given sufficient room to grow. The tree’s shape begins as a classic pyramid, but becomes twisted when growing and being exposed to high winds. This is a great option to add a unique touch to a winter landscape.

Christmas Rose

These beautiful, cold-loving flowers are nicknamed Christmas Rose due to their unlikely habit of blooming outside in early winter. With the right conditions, these flowers can brighten your landscape and your porch well into the New Year. They also stay through early spring. Planting this perennial (which means they multiply and continue growing for at least three years) in the spring will garner the best results throughout the seasons.

Snowdrop Flowers

Snowdrop flowers are named so for their white drop-shaped blooms which point downward. These flowers grow from bulbs and are perennial as well. Snowdrops are not only named for their white color, but because they are known to bloom as early as February and don’t wait for the snow to melt before sprouting out of the ground. While these flowers might not be out all winter, they are hearty enough to survive cold temperatures and bloom before the season’s end.

Winterberrywinterberry in winter

Winterberry is a shrub which loses its leaves in the fall and leaves only the red or gold berries. These bright remains provide a beautiful contrast against white snow. Winterberry is also a type of holly which can be used to decorate the home during the winter season. The berries stay for multiple weeks or months into the winter season. In the spring, the shrub will also blossom with tiny white flowers that will turn into berries again once the leaves fall.

Witch Hazel

Fragrant in summer, these resilient plants put out clusters of spidery yellow and red blooms that blaze like flashes of sunlight in the heart of winter. Depending on the temperatures during the winter months, the ribbon-like petals of these flowers will crinkle up and expand afterwards. Witch Hazel is a sizeable shrub and as such, the ideal spot in a garden or landscape will offer a lot of room for growth. While called a shrub, this plant can potentially grow as high as 15 feet tall and almost as wide. Witch hazel should be planted in the fall for best results throughout the year.

Cold weather is not an automatic indication that your landscape will look dull and lifeless. You can plant some of these resilient plants to brighten your Ohio winter. Contact us to discuss these and further options for your winter landscape.

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How Does Winter Weather Affect Landscaping?

While winter weather can be beautiful to look at, it can have an ugly impact on your landscaping. Cold weather brings dry air, snow, and frost which can leave your plants and lawn looking run-down by the time the spring season finally arrives. Here’s a closer look at the effects of winter on landscaping:

Wind Damage
Wind can cause damage in any season, and in the winter, it can also be accompanied by snow. Blowing snow drifts can cause snow to pile up on some areas of the lawn, while other spots may see less accumulation. This can cause some areas to see worse damage than others. Winds can also lead to downed branches from trees and shrubs. Even if the plant is well-established, this damage can still kill it. To prevent this, pruning before the winter is important. During the season, you may also consider shaking the snow off or gently removing it with a broom.

Dry Air
Winter can bring plenty of moisture in the form of frost, snow, and ice, but the cold air that sticks around for months is dry and lacking in moisture. Just like our lips and skin dry out after exposure to the cold, plants will too. The dry air, especially when combined with the wind, can cause plants of all kinds to dry out. Evergreen trees are especially vulnerable to damage from the dry air. One way to reduce the negative effects is by pruning and fertilizing plants before the cold air sets in.

Heavy, Wet Snow
Snow can lead to several different problems for plants and lawns. One issue is snow mold growth, which occurs when snow that has accumulated on turf starts to melt. The mold growth leads to patches of brown and pink which kills the grass. In the spring, the grass may need to be raked and reseeded if the damage is too severe. Prevention is the key, and can be handled by properly aerating and fertilizing the lawn beforehand.

winter weather affects landscaping

Heavy snowfall can also damage plants and trees. As snow piles up on branches, it can cause the branches to sag and snap under the weight. Again, proper pruning of trees, shrubs, and other small plants is essential in the weeks before the cold and wet weather settles in. By keeping these plants pruned, it will be easier to prevent limb breakage.

Professional Care
One of the best ways to keep your lawn and gardens in great shape is by working with a professional landscaper. They have the right equipment, knowledge, and skills to maintain the look and quality of your landscaping throughout the year. Proper prevention can help reduce the damage that cold winter weather can do to your property.

When it comes to keeping your landscaping looking its best throughout the year, proper preventative measures and quality care-taking measures are key. By taking steps to protect your lawn and garden, you’ll be able to ensure that the cold weather doesn’t do severe damage to your landscaping during the winter months.

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Keeping Your Lawn Healthy During The Winter Season

15732391_10154182105792083_414141784161579441_oEven while your lawn is dormant during the winter, there are steps you can take to keep your grass healthy. Please see the winter landscaping tips below:

Clean Up. Remove toys and rake up leaves and other debris. If this is not done, the grass will not get the sunlight required to keep it healthy. However, the same rule does not apply to mulching, as disbursing the clipping onto the grass actually provides it with water and nutrients.

Water. If watering is necessary, it should be done by midday. Doing this will ensure the water soaks in before freezing temperatures set in at night. Pooling water in certain areas of the lawn could cause damage once it freezes. A more infrequent and deeper watering pattern will help to beef up the rooting system.

Cover Plants (if necessary). As necessary, make note of weather patterns and provide cover for your plants to avoid freezing. Either cloth or plastic covers can be used. Cloths covers are said to provide better coverage; however, they can become weighed down and heavy when they get wet. For plastic covers, you can prevent them from touching the ground by using stakes around the plants. It should also be noted that if any part of the plant touches the plastic, the plant could still freeze.

Do Not Walk on Frozen Grass. The crunch heard while walking on your frozen lawn could actually be the sound of grass breaking. Therefore, you should avoid mowing or walking on it. Even in a dormant state, the look of a lawn that gets a good amount of traffic during winter will be negatively affected when spring comes around.

Following these winter landscaping tips can help you to preserve a beautifully manicured lawn. It could actually become the envy of the neighborhood when spring comes around.

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Winter Landscaping In 5 Easy Steps

shutterstock_319127498Certain things don’t require you to be a rocket scientist to know that something is amiss, somehow. So you’re greeted by a chill in the air the moment you step outside late at night, or early in the morning. It’s getting dark a lot earlier than normal and the flowers, bushes and trees around your yard appear paler, almost morose like. This only means one thing, and one thing only: Winter is here! If you love your garden to death like i do, you should be all over the place like a headless chicken, frantically trying to preserve what’s left of your once vibrant vines, rosebushes and shrubs. Winter landscaping is not a walk in the park like most people would like to believe. Which is why you need professional landscaping company to show you how it’s done.

Step 1: Insulation.

Frost bite is not exclusive to humans, nature experiences is too. Insulating your plants prior to winter is surely a must if some of them are prone to ice or cold damage. One traditional method that springs to mind are containers of water that are placed around plants. Rather than attacking your vegetables and flowers, the cold -ice included- is absorbed by the water, thereby providing much needed insulation. Modern methods have, however evolved over the centuries, and now we have garden fabric which is tied around plants to trap heat and bring about the same effect as the aforementioned method.

Step 2: Mowing And Manuring

Winter may not provide much scenic beauty but it doesn’t hurt to prepare for springtime. Mowing the lawn and fertilizing it with garden or lawn manure ensures that your garden springs back to life with increased effervescence.

Step 3: Trim Bushes and Hedges

Next thing on the menu is the trimming of bushes and hedges. This aids in preserving important nutrients for the arrival of spring.

Step 4: Dress The Part

There is no beating around the bush when it comes to planting seasonal flowers that do well in winter. We will decorate your garden with life defying Acacia’s, vibrant carnations, charming orchids or simple lilies if that tickles your fancy.

Step 5: Professional Landscaping

Last but not least, remember to consult with a professional landscaping company. Landscaping is hard work, but your beautiful surroundings don’t have to suffer because you hardly have enough time, or the spirit to do it yourself.

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February Landscaping Tips For Homeowners

Screen Shot 2016-02-19 at 3.21.42 PMWith the spring season just around the corner, homeowners should start to prepare their property for the months ahead. Cold temperatures, snow, and icy conditions can continue for several more weeks, but there are some helpful landscaping tips that can be used as the weather begins to ease up. As winter draws to a close by the end of February, there are some simple steps that can be taken to get the lawn and garden ready for the upcoming growing season.

Cleaning Up. While you likely cleaned up your lawn and garden at the end of fall, there’s a good chance that leaves and other debris have accumulated again over the winter months. Take the time to collect and remove any dead leaves, branches, and other debris from the yard and from flower beds. If you have containers or pots that need to be cleaned out, now is a good time to do so. Then, once you have new flowers and seeds, you will be ready to get them potted and planted right away.

Pruning. It’s safe to start pruning some bushes and trees this month, such as berry bushes, fruit trees, and wood shrubs. You can also cut back any ornamental grasses. However, you want to avoid pruning flowering bushes that will be producing blooms in the spring. Leave those plants alone for now, since they will be producing buds shortly.

Start Planning. Another easy thing to prepare for the spring is to start thinking about what types of plants you will want to purchase and grow. Do some research on the best flowers, shrubs, trees, and other types of plants for your region and for the specific areas you want to fill in. If you are going to grow a vegetable garden, this is a good time to begin acquiring seeds. Start creating a scheme for flower beds and gardens so that you know just where to plant each item.

While the temperature still may be quite cold in February, it’s not too early to start landscaping. February is the ideal time to prepare. Get ahead so that when the warmer weather comes, you’ll be ready to plant, mow, and grow.

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Mid-Winter Landscaping Tips

Screen Shot 2016-01-25 at 9.17.35 AMWinter can bring a joyful break from mowing every week, but don’t forget about your landscaping all winter long. Here are a few mid-winter tips for keeping your lawn healthy during the winter season.

Clean up: Leaving debris and leaves on your lawn during winter is extremely detrimental. It will smother your grass and can create disease and invite insects and mice. When an object is left on the grass during winter and snow fall, it creates dead patches in your grass from the weight on the object. Quickly rake away any dead leaves and pick up all backyard toys during these cold weather months.

Avoid Excessive Traffic: The grass under the snow can tolerate a moderate amount of traffic. A lot of traffic will make your grass have a harder time recovering during the spring. Avoid walking on your lawn frequently. This can compact and kill the grass. And avoid parking cars and trucks on your lawn during the winter as well. Even a small, compact car can kill your grass that is under the tires. Using your lawn for parking may kill your grass for good.

Level Out The Snow: When your lawn is covered by heavy snow for a long period of time, mold can attack the grass. The disease can grow under layers of snow during the winter. You can prevent mold by simply spreading out the large snow piles. Take an extra few minutes and evenly distribute the snow out on your lawn.

Don’t have time for these winter landscaping tasks? Call us today for snow and winter maintenance!

 

 

 

 

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